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Matt Fitzpatrick is a ‘deserved’ US Open champion, according to Sky Sports’ Jamie Weir Golf News

Matt Fitzpatrick leaves no stone unturned to get better every day, says Sky Sports' Jamie Weir

Matt Fitzpatrick leaves no stone unturned to get better every day, says Sky Sports’ Jamie Weir

“I can’t think of a more deserving person to have joined the club of golf’s greatest winners than Matt Fitzpatrick,” said Sky Sports’ Jamie Weir.

Fitzpatrick won the US Open at Brookline on Sunday night after holding off playing partner Will Zatoris in a thrilling finals.

The victory puts the 27-year-old from Sheffield in good company after becoming only the second man – after the great Jack Nicklaus – to win both the US Amateur and the US Open at the same venue.

“His meticulous diligence and dedication to his craft is incredible to watch. He leaves no stone unturned in his determination to get better every day. His yardage books are like encyclopedias; every shot he hits — in tournament play, in practice rounds, even tapping in casual play with friends — is noted for reference and learning from,” Weir said.

“This year his tireless hard work has paid off and taken his game to a whole new level. Constantly challenged on the PGA Tour without really making one across the finish line, he competed in the PGA Championship and has now landed one of the game’s top spots and coveted titles.

Fitzpatrick was speechless after capturing his first major title

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Fitzpatrick was speechless after capturing his first major title

Fitzpatrick was speechless after capturing his first major title

“The change in his game is really extraordinary. Once considered one of the shorter clubs in golf, it’s now at the forefront of longer players. I walked nine holes with him on Thursday; he played alongside Dustin Johnson – known for hitting the ball a country mile – and Fitz passed him on several occasions.

“At the Monster 15th all week he was the only player I saw hitting the path that cuts the fairway – about 375 yards from the tee! – attempted to hit the green on the short par 4 5. None of them made it. Fitz made it.

“In his last round, he usually hit 17 of the 18 greens. That’s almost unthinkable given the rigorous test that a US Open always presents and given Brookline’s tiny greens. Consider he was in the last group on the last day, with the added pressure that entails, and it will go down in history as one of THE greatest finals of all time in a major championship. And what about his shot from the fairway -Bunker at 72 all the time.”

Weir continued, “And all of this just a month after an experience that may have spooked fewer players; at the PGA Championships in Tulsa, again in the last group on a Sunday at a major, he didn’t really get going. It was a day that he bravely clung to but clearly didn’t have his best stuff as he missed the subsequent playoffs by a couple of stokes. For many, this would have led to self-doubt: Will I get another chance? If I can do it this time?

He won his first major title at the US Open with a two-putt par on the 72nd hole

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He won his first major title at the US Open with a two-putt par on the 72nd hole

He won his first major title at the US Open with a two-putt par on the 72nd hole

“The answer to both questions was yes in the case of Fitz, and that was only a few weeks later. The resilience required not only to shake off that disappointment but to use it as fuel to seal the deal at the next major championship is a testament to his mental toughness from his first tee on Sunday to his 68th. On the day’s shot – a tap-in on the 18th green – this was another Matt Fitzpatrick, one with his teeth between his teeth, fully focused and determined to take advantage of the opportunity.

“But it’s more than just that. The reason this will be such a popular win is because of who Fitz is as a person. You couldn’t ask for a more likeable and down to earth character. He’s unassuming, confidently dismissive, and has that typically wry Yorkshire wit. There’s no airs and graces about him, and this win may change his life – but it won’t change him one bit.

“On Wednesday last week I agreed to do an interview with him after he finished practicing. I took off, chatted up some caddies and lost track of time. My phone buzzed in my pocket, a text from me to cameraman Chris, “We’re waiting for you!” I jogged back to the putting green to find Fitz and Chris chattering away like two old buddies as Fitz had waited patiently for a good five minutes. I can assure you the vast majority of players wouldn’t have bothered.”

Of Fitz’s family background, Weir said, “It’s hardly surprising when you meet his family. Fitz is cut from the same cloth as his parents Russell and Sue; approachable, down to earth, naturally decent people. The aforementioned Chris and I went a few holes with them at the Ryder Cup last September and they are just so easy to talk to.” His brother Alex – who is very different in personality, much more outgoing and outwardly confident – ​​adores him Soil That’s So Big Brother Goes On He’s just beginning his professional golf career but couldn’t ask for a better role model to learn from.

Fitzpatrick produced an incredible shot from the bunker on the 72nd hole of the US Open at Brookline

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Fitzpatrick produced an incredible shot from the bunker on the 72nd hole of the US Open at Brookline

Fitzpatrick produced an incredible shot from the bunker on the 72nd hole of the US Open at Brookline

“He also surrounds himself with good people. His manager Ted is charming, friendly and so accommodating. Always with a big smile on his face, he would bend over backwards to help you. So many in the world of golf are equally passionate about his caddy, Billy Foster, a 40-year veteran who has worked with some of football’s greatest players – Tiger Woods, Seve Ballesteros, Lee Westwood and Darren Clarke – to see how emotional he was when it dawned on him that he finally was being part of a big winning team was a beautiful moment.

“The country club in Brookline couldn’t have been a suitable place. The course itself was wonderful, featuring drama and a stacked leaderboard that included the top three players in the world and a variety of great champions. How it took the USGA 34 years to finally bring its Open back there is a mystery, and hopefully the wait for the next one will be a lot shorter.

“It’s also the venue where caddy Francis Ouimet sensationally won the US Open in 1913, bringing golf to the masses of the United States. His influence on the game cannot be underestimated.

“Exactly a century later, 18-year-old Matt Fitzpatrick won the US Amateur there, a feat rarely achieved by foreign players. And nine years after that triumph he’s won the big one – the Major, which is fast becoming a happy hunting ground for European golfers. After Tony Jacklin’s victory in 1970, it was a 40-year wait for this continent’s next winner, beating out the likes of the game’s greats like Faldo, Ballesteros, Langer and Lyle. Europe have now provided six of the last 13 champions.

“The scenes on Brookline’s 18th green as a visibly stunned Matt Fitzpatrick hugged his parents and brother and was welcomed into the big club by Rory McIlroy summed up what golf is all about. Those moments of glory when all the hard work and sacrifice paid off and you’ve followed in the footsteps of the legends of the game.”

Brad Faxon analyzes Fitzpatrick's unique and clumsy chipping style

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Brad Faxon analyzes Fitzpatrick’s unique and clumsy chipping style

Brad Faxon analyzes Fitzpatrick’s unique and clumsy chipping style

Weir added, “Amidst the euphoria, Fitz will have had no idea what his winning check was; it was about achieving a lifetime goal of being able to call yourself a great champion, getting your hands on this stunning trophy and seeing the names Nicklaus, Palmer, Hogan, Jones, Woods and now Fitzpatrick all etched on it.

“There are some people who want to tear the game of golf apart, regardless of its history or tradition. One of the most dramatic and exciting final days in recent major championship history, capped by a shot that will be repeated for many years to come and the crowing of a worthy, humble and fully deserved champion is proof that there are some things that money can’t buy.”

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